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Energy Zappers 

1. Dehydration
Your extreme fatigue might be coming from hidden sources. Nixing these spirit-depleting factors from your life will automatically help reboot your verve.
It turns out that even moderate dehydration (which results in the loss of 3 percent of your body weight) can make you feel mentally sluggish and mess with your concentration. The next time you're feeling foggy or lightheaded, don't just assume you're in serious need of some food. Try downing a glass or two of water.

2. Cell Phones
Checking your cell before bed amps up brain activity, making it harder to doze off. Plus, any electronic gadget's artificial blue light can suppress the sleep hormone melatonin. A 2011 poll by the National Sleep Foundation found that 20 percent of people ages 19 to 29 are awakened by a call, text, or e-mail at least a few nights a week. Power it down well before bedtime.

3. Medication
Many drugs have veiled energy-sapping side effects. Chief among them are some classes of antidepressants and certain beta-blockers used to prevent migraines or treat high blood pressure. If you start a new med and feel more lethargic than usual, see doctor Bert for an alternative. (If there isn't one, take your dose right before bed.)

 4. Overtraining
While working out zaps the stress hormone cortisol, prolonged sweat sessions--like, for example, regularly running for more than 30 minutes at a steady rate--can actually rev cortisol production. Interval training (bursts of intense activity) combined with strength training (free-weight and body-weight moves) helps keep cortisol in check.

5. Low Iron
The mineral shuttles oxygen around your body and removes waste from your cells. If you're not getting around 18 milligrams a day, your body struggles to function properly and you can feel worn out; low iron levels in your diet can cause iron deficiency anemia. If you feel sluggish, call our office and ask for a simple blood test to see if you should be taking a supplement. 

For more information please call our office at 786-360-6355 

Five Small Meals

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Chiropractic Care and Healthy Eating

Regular chiropractic care and consistent, healthy nutrition represent two powerful lifestyle choices for people interested in supporting their long-term health and well-being.

These life-affirming action steps work together to give you more energy, more restful sleep, and an overall positive mental attitude. When you don't get enough nutritious food, your body doesn't work properly. Supplies aren't available to build strong cells and tissues. Toxins accumulate. People wonder why they feel tired and listless. A big part of the answer is too much of the foods that are harmful and not enough of the foods that have high nutritional content.

Also, when your body's out of alignment, joints, muscles, cartilage, and ligaments are all working against each other. Your body wastes energy because these biomechanical structures are literally at cross purposes. Even maintaining a seated posture or standing for a few minutes becomes stressful and painful. Regular chiropractic care addresses these biomechanical problems and helps your body to work much more easily and efficiently.

Regular chiropractic care and healthy nutrition work together to provide optimal health. There may even be delightful, unexpected benefits as your body and mind begin to work in harmony.

Plenty of people go through plenty of suffering trying to lose weight. But why does it have to be that way? Surely there's some discipline involved, but the process can actually be empowering and personally fulfilling. Weight loss doesn't need to be about suffering. Losing weight can actually be fun.  

The fun part of losing weight is the fulfillment and personal satisfaction you get out of doing what you said you'd do. The fun part is seeing the pounds come off, week by week. The fun part is seeing yourself get back in shape. And, the very fun part is the free day that you enjoy each week. The free day is built-in to your losing-weight food plan.

What's a free day? You want to be on a food plan that changes your body's metabolism - one that flattens out your blood glucose levels, one that flattens out your blood insulin levels. The result is a body that knows how to burn glucose for energy, rather than a body that's out of synch and stores glucose as fat.1,2

The best way to normalize your metabolism is to eat five or six small meals per day. This is not news. This powerful approach to maintaining optimal body weight has been around for many decades. And the multiple small meals food plan works just as well today.3

This approach has a surprise bonus - a built-in fun factor - the free day. The free day fulfills two important functions. First, your body needs to know that it's not in starvation mode. If your body thinks it's starving, you'll begin to store fat. So you actually need to have a free day once a week.

Your free day also has a very important psychological purpose. You're doing work and following a plan. A break from the plan is necessary, otherwise it's going to become boring. It's great to look forward to your free day and the opportunity to break the routine.

On your free day you can eat anything you want. After a while, you become less exorbitant on your free day. You still eat more pure-fun foods, but you find you're eating less in terms of mass quantities. You just get more normalized, naturally, as you find yourself listening more to what your body really wants and needs.

Your free day, combined with the ongoing positive feedback from your bathroom scale, makes it possible and realistic to continue on the multiple small meals per day plan.

Over time your weekly weight loss decreases and eventually you stop losing weight - you've reached your body's natural weight. This is a major accomplishment. Your food plan has become a way of life. You've learned how to eat so that you're healthy, fit, and well. Make sure you celebrate!

1Otani H: Oxidative stress as pathogenesis of cardiovascular risk associated with metabolic syndrome. Antiox Redox Signal 15(7):1911-1926, 2011
2Brietzke SA: A personalized approach to metabolic aspects of obesity. Mt Sinai J Med 77(5):499-510, 2010
3Roth CL, et al: Changes in adipose-derived inflammatory cytokines and chemokines after successful lifestyle intervention in obese children. Metabolism 60(4):445-452, 2011