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Energy Zappers 

1. Dehydration
Your extreme fatigue might be coming from hidden sources. Nixing these spirit-depleting factors from your life will automatically help reboot your verve.
It turns out that even moderate dehydration (which results in the loss of 3 percent of your body weight) can make you feel mentally sluggish and mess with your concentration. The next time you're feeling foggy or lightheaded, don't just assume you're in serious need of some food. Try downing a glass or two of water.

2. Cell Phones
Checking your cell before bed amps up brain activity, making it harder to doze off. Plus, any electronic gadget's artificial blue light can suppress the sleep hormone melatonin. A 2011 poll by the National Sleep Foundation found that 20 percent of people ages 19 to 29 are awakened by a call, text, or e-mail at least a few nights a week. Power it down well before bedtime.

3. Medication
Many drugs have veiled energy-sapping side effects. Chief among them are some classes of antidepressants and certain beta-blockers used to prevent migraines or treat high blood pressure. If you start a new med and feel more lethargic than usual, see doctor Bert for an alternative. (If there isn't one, take your dose right before bed.)

 4. Overtraining
While working out zaps the stress hormone cortisol, prolonged sweat sessions--like, for example, regularly running for more than 30 minutes at a steady rate--can actually rev cortisol production. Interval training (bursts of intense activity) combined with strength training (free-weight and body-weight moves) helps keep cortisol in check.

5. Low Iron
The mineral shuttles oxygen around your body and removes waste from your cells. If you're not getting around 18 milligrams a day, your body struggles to function properly and you can feel worn out; low iron levels in your diet can cause iron deficiency anemia. If you feel sluggish, call our office and ask for a simple blood test to see if you should be taking a supplement. 

For more information please call our office at 786-360-6355 

The Goldilocks Way

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"Just Right" Exercise

 Cardiovascular and strength training exercises are a potent tag team for health promotion. Each form of exercise contributes to the value of the other. The combination provides strength, endurance, balance, and coordination, enhancing your overall health and well-being.

Cardiovascular training boosts the ability of your heart and lungs to make oxygen available to the rest of your body. When you do strength training, your muscles get stronger faster because of the increased oxygen availability. Likewise, strength training indirectly trains your heart and lungs, owing to the increased demand for oxygen by muscles that are working intensely. So each form of training complements and improves the performance of the other.

Ideally we're training six days a week, but of course that's not always possible. Even dedicated exercisers go through periods of downtime. Life happens. The secret is to keep going in some way, and get back to your regular routine as soon as possible.

The good news is when you've developed a moderately high level of physical fitness, you'll always be able to recover quickly from downtime or other breaks in your regular routine.

Keep training!
Like Goldilocks, we want things to work out just right. When it comes to our health, though, things don't work out just right by themselves.

Neglect causes many serious health problems. Abuse - in the form of unhealthy behaviors - causes many additional serious disorders.

Every day on TV and radio news programs we hear about the importance of healthy eating and exercise.1 But most of us don't know how to apply these recommendations to ourselves and to our families. The Goldilocks approach could resolve a lot of the confusion and provide a great deal of value.

How would Goldilocks put a healthy lifestyle into practice? "Just right" would be her mantra. Not too much, not too little, but just right. How would Goldilocks approach a healthy diet? She would choose a food plan that didn't require a lot of effort. She'd quickly teach herself to read labels and count calories, and once she'd done that she'd learn a core group of easy-to-prepare recipes. She'd train herself to go shopping only once a week and she'd prepare a shopping list before each trip.

Goldilocks wants her family to eat healthily, but she wisely doesn't want food to be a big preoccupation. She wants this lifestyle change to be a no-brainer.

What about exercise? Goldilocks is pretty tired of listening to her friends smugly talking about how good they feel and how they went from a size whatever to two sizes less. Goldilocks want to feel good, too, but doesn't want to take on more than she can handle. She wants a "just right" exercise plan.2,3

Goldilocks talks to a friend who is just as busy as she is and learns a few secrets. First, she learns how to do a high-intensity cardio workout in only 15 minutes. "That's all?" she asks her friend, who reassures her that 15 minutes is the new 30. Next, her friend explains how to do a complete program of strength training in two 30-minute sessions - done a day or two apart, of course. "Only 30 minutes?" Goldilocks is skeptical. "Thirty is the new 60!" her friend affirms. "Check-out my arms. That's all muscle, girl!"

After only a few weeks on her new fitness program, Goldilocks is so pleased with the results that she shares what she's doing with her husband and teenage son and daughter. Months later, everyone in her family notices a rekindled togetherness and family spirit.

Goldilocks shares her experiences with her chiropractor and admits she wishes she'd acted on her chiropractor's nutritional and exercise recommendations sooner. "No worries," her chiropractor replies. (Goldilocks lives in California.) "I'm giving a health care and wellness talk at our local high school next week. Would you like to be part of the talk and share what you've been learning?"

"I'd love to!" exclaims Goldilocks. "Thank you again, Doctor, for always helping everyone in my family!"

1Loimaala A, et al: Effect of long-term endurance and strength training on metabolic control and arterial elasticity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Am J Cardiol 103(7):972-977, 2009
2Monteiro AG, et al: Acute physiological responses to different circuit training protocols. J Sports Med Phys Fitness 48():438-442, 2008
3Lakka TA, Bouchard C: Physical activity, obesity, and cardiovascular diseases. Handb Exp Pharmacol 170:137-163, 2005