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Energy Zappers 

1. Dehydration
Your extreme fatigue might be coming from hidden sources. Nixing these spirit-depleting factors from your life will automatically help reboot your verve.
It turns out that even moderate dehydration (which results in the loss of 3 percent of your body weight) can make you feel mentally sluggish and mess with your concentration. The next time you're feeling foggy or lightheaded, don't just assume you're in serious need of some food. Try downing a glass or two of water.

2. Cell Phones
Checking your cell before bed amps up brain activity, making it harder to doze off. Plus, any electronic gadget's artificial blue light can suppress the sleep hormone melatonin. A 2011 poll by the National Sleep Foundation found that 20 percent of people ages 19 to 29 are awakened by a call, text, or e-mail at least a few nights a week. Power it down well before bedtime.

3. Medication
Many drugs have veiled energy-sapping side effects. Chief among them are some classes of antidepressants and certain beta-blockers used to prevent migraines or treat high blood pressure. If you start a new med and feel more lethargic than usual, see doctor Bert for an alternative. (If there isn't one, take your dose right before bed.)

 4. Overtraining
While working out zaps the stress hormone cortisol, prolonged sweat sessions--like, for example, regularly running for more than 30 minutes at a steady rate--can actually rev cortisol production. Interval training (bursts of intense activity) combined with strength training (free-weight and body-weight moves) helps keep cortisol in check.

5. Low Iron
The mineral shuttles oxygen around your body and removes waste from your cells. If you're not getting around 18 milligrams a day, your body struggles to function properly and you can feel worn out; low iron levels in your diet can cause iron deficiency anemia. If you feel sluggish, call our office and ask for a simple blood test to see if you should be taking a supplement. 

For more information please call our office at 786-360-6355 

The Long View

The Long View of Healthy
Chiropractic Care and Long-Term Health

Whenever we think about long-term health and well being, we may also think of regular chiropractic care. In addition to periodic check-ups for blood pressure, laboratory tests, and other aspects of health care maintenance, regular chiropractic care helps ensure that your nerve system is intact and functioning effectively. Importantly, if your nerve system is not doing its job, other steps you're taking to achieve good health may come up short.

For example, regular vigorous exercise and a nutritious diet are key components of a healthy lifestyle. But if your nerve system is not appropriately coordinating the functioning of your musculoskeletal, cardiorespiratory, gastrointestinal, and hormonal systems on a moment-by-moment basis, you may not achieve the benefits you're hoping for from your investment of time and effort. By helping your nerve system function at peak levels, regular chiropractic care assists in the achievement of long-term good health.

In general most people pay close attention to auto maintenance. Whether the concern is tires, brakes, transmission, or windshield status, people make sure that their cars do what they need them to do.  People count on their cars to perform effectively. No one wants a surprise, especially in a critical situation. But in stark contrast, people often give much less consideration to their own physical functioning and capacity than they do to several critical performance factors related to their own automobiles.

The metaphor of machine upkeep standing in for health maintenance is commonplace but apt. To prove the point, most of us allow our physical conditioning to deteriorate far beyond that which we would ever tolerate relative to our cars or even our power lawnmowers. The immediate consequences of such neglect are the developed world epidemic in diabetes, the United States–based epidemic in obesity, and the ongoing high levels of cardiovascular disease worldwide.

What redress is required with respect to our physical health and welfare? As with our cars, the long view is needed. If we lease a new car every year, upkeep is not an issue beyond an oil and filter change or two. But if we want our car to continue to perform reliably for three, five, or ten years, regularly scheduled service is necessary. Our cars need check-ups every 12 months or so. As flesh-and-blood organisms, we require a similar schedule of maintenance.

Importantly, feeling fine is not necessarily a good guide to how we're doing from a health perspective. High blood pressure, for example, is known as the "silent killer." There are no fully recognizable signs and symptoms of hypertension, until it's too late.1 By the time a person has had a debilitating heart attack or stroke, high blood pressure has probably been in place for years. Similarly, the early symptoms and signs of diabetes are subtle and seemingly harmless. Fatigue and an inability to focus may be ignored or interpreted as mere symptoms of an overly stressed lifestyle.  Frequent thirst and frequent urination might be conveniently explained away as side effects of poor eating habits. Again, serious damage may be done, possibly involving one's kidneys and one's vision, as a result of undiagnosed and untreated diabetes.2

The solution to helping prevent such potentially serious health problems is to make sure you have regular check-ups.  Operating on the long view, rather than operating as the proverbial ostrich (with his head buried in the sand) or the proverbial grasshopper (who fiddled all day), we will have annual or biannual blood pressure readings and blood tests. Appropriate scheduling for such check-ups will be specific to the individual, based upon age, past medical history, and family history. The critical takeaway is to practice preventive health care based on the long view.3 Perform personal maintenance and service checks as needed.

1Kumar N, et al: Management of patients with resistant hypertension: current treatment options. Integr Blood Press Control 6:139-151, 20132
2Adebayo O, Willis GC: Changing Face of Diabetes in America. Emerg Med Clin North Am 32(2):319-327, 2014
3Lynch EB, et al: A self-management intervention for african americans with comorbid diabetes and hypertension: a pilot randomized controlled trial. Prev Chronic Dis 2014 May 29;11:E90. doi: 10.5888/pcd11.130349