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Energy Zappers 

1. Dehydration
Your extreme fatigue might be coming from hidden sources. Nixing these spirit-depleting factors from your life will automatically help reboot your verve.
It turns out that even moderate dehydration (which results in the loss of 3 percent of your body weight) can make you feel mentally sluggish and mess with your concentration. The next time you're feeling foggy or lightheaded, don't just assume you're in serious need of some food. Try downing a glass or two of water.

2. Cell Phones
Checking your cell before bed amps up brain activity, making it harder to doze off. Plus, any electronic gadget's artificial blue light can suppress the sleep hormone melatonin. A 2011 poll by the National Sleep Foundation found that 20 percent of people ages 19 to 29 are awakened by a call, text, or e-mail at least a few nights a week. Power it down well before bedtime.

3. Medication
Many drugs have veiled energy-sapping side effects. Chief among them are some classes of antidepressants and certain beta-blockers used to prevent migraines or treat high blood pressure. If you start a new med and feel more lethargic than usual, see doctor Bert for an alternative. (If there isn't one, take your dose right before bed.)

 4. Overtraining
While working out zaps the stress hormone cortisol, prolonged sweat sessions--like, for example, regularly running for more than 30 minutes at a steady rate--can actually rev cortisol production. Interval training (bursts of intense activity) combined with strength training (free-weight and body-weight moves) helps keep cortisol in check.

5. Low Iron
The mineral shuttles oxygen around your body and removes waste from your cells. If you're not getting around 18 milligrams a day, your body struggles to function properly and you can feel worn out; low iron levels in your diet can cause iron deficiency anemia. If you feel sluggish, call our office and ask for a simple blood test to see if you should be taking a supplement. 

For more information please call our office at 786-360-6355 

Choose the Right Shoes

Look around any crowded city street, and you'll see plenty of footwear— from stiletto heels to platform shoes— that is more than a little unkind to our feet. It's no wonder that foot pain is such a common complaint. But it's not just our feet that are hurting. Improper footwear places strain on the knees, hips and back. According to Karen Achtermann, DC, your feet serve three purposes: support, locomotion and shock absorption. So, support your body by following these guidelines for proper footwear.

Leave the High-Heels Behind

Women, listen up: The higher the heel on your shoe, the greater the amount of stress placed on your forefoot. High-heeled shoes can contribute to the collapse of one or more of the foot's three arches. These shoes also place undue stress on the ankle, which can lead to ankle instability and sprains. Plus, when you wear high-heels your calf muscles shorten, warns Achtermann. Then, if you alternate between high heels and flat shoes, your calf muscles go through a shorten/lengthen cycle that can lead to pelvic imbalances and low back pain.

Consider Orthotics

Many chiropractors recommend orthotics. There are two kinds of orthotics: the simple, commercially-made insoles that are available at outdoor sports or shoe stores, and custom orthotics. Custom orthotics are superior since they are tailored to your individual foot and are designed to correct for your particular imbalances. These are created by making an impression of each foot called a cast, and then correcting for specific misalignments. According to Achtermann, custom orthotics help to prevent dysfunction of the lower body and legs, and decrease spinal stress.