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Energy Zappers 

1. Dehydration
Your extreme fatigue might be coming from hidden sources. Nixing these spirit-depleting factors from your life will automatically help reboot your verve.
It turns out that even moderate dehydration (which results in the loss of 3 percent of your body weight) can make you feel mentally sluggish and mess with your concentration. The next time you're feeling foggy or lightheaded, don't just assume you're in serious need of some food. Try downing a glass or two of water.

2. Cell Phones
Checking your cell before bed amps up brain activity, making it harder to doze off. Plus, any electronic gadget's artificial blue light can suppress the sleep hormone melatonin. A 2011 poll by the National Sleep Foundation found that 20 percent of people ages 19 to 29 are awakened by a call, text, or e-mail at least a few nights a week. Power it down well before bedtime.

3. Medication
Many drugs have veiled energy-sapping side effects. Chief among them are some classes of antidepressants and certain beta-blockers used to prevent migraines or treat high blood pressure. If you start a new med and feel more lethargic than usual, see doctor Bert for an alternative. (If there isn't one, take your dose right before bed.)

 4. Overtraining
While working out zaps the stress hormone cortisol, prolonged sweat sessions--like, for example, regularly running for more than 30 minutes at a steady rate--can actually rev cortisol production. Interval training (bursts of intense activity) combined with strength training (free-weight and body-weight moves) helps keep cortisol in check.

5. Low Iron
The mineral shuttles oxygen around your body and removes waste from your cells. If you're not getting around 18 milligrams a day, your body struggles to function properly and you can feel worn out; low iron levels in your diet can cause iron deficiency anemia. If you feel sluggish, call our office and ask for a simple blood test to see if you should be taking a supplement. 

For more information please call our office at 786-360-6355 

Taking Care of Business

chiropractic and exercise

Regular Chiropractic Care and Healthy Exercise

Whether you are just starting an exercise program or someone who has been exercising regularly for many years, chiropractic care is an important component of your fitness activities. Just as regular exercise increases a person's flexibility and stamina, so too does exercise require a certain baseline level of flexibility and stretchability.

All types of exercise involve range of motion maneuvers of the spine and other weight-bearing joints such as the hips, knees, and ankles. Biomechanical limitations or restrictions within these structures, especially those of the spine, may cause muscle irritation, inflammation, and even injury. Regular chiropractic care, by detecting and correcting sources of nerve interference, helps to reduce and resolve biomechanical dysfunction in the spine. The result is increased spinal mobility, greater overall freedom of movement, and an enhanced ability to successfully perform a wide range of exercise activities. Regular chiropractic care helps you get the most out of your exercise and supports your long-term goals of health and well-being.

At various times, all of us are occupied to a greater or lesser extent with activities of daily living that require physical exertion. If we live in a suburb, when we've completed our shopping at the local mall we place filled grocery bags into the trunks of our cars and haul them out of those trunks when we get home. If we live in a city, we may carry similarly filled shopping bags for several blocks or even farther to cover the distance between the supermarket and our home. Once we're home, we may need to store some of the products we've purchased on the top shelves of kitchen cabinets, closets, and (again, if we live outside the city) the storage space in our garage. Other typical daily or periodic home-based activities include cleaning, doing the laundry, gardening, and taking out and bringing in trashcans or carrying trash to the disposal unit.

All such exertions require appropriate amounts of strength and flexibility for effective maneuverability. For example, an intact and functioning rotator cuff and sufficient shoulder range of motion are needed to be able to reach up and store on a top-level shelf grocery items that won't be used for a while. As well, sufficient flexibility and strength in our hips, knees, and ankles are needed to effectively perform a wide range of household functions. Typically, we take all such abilities for granted. We usually don't consider what's required from a biomechanical point of view as we go through our day, doing things automatically that we've done in the same way for many years. But many of us have friends or family members who have undergone shoulder surgery as a result of an injury sustained while performing a common activity around the house. Many of us also have friends or family members who have had knee or hip replacement surgery, even though they seemed too young at the time to have required such a major procedure.

These surgeries are usually done to fix problems resulting from what is described as osteoarthritis.1,2 Osteoarthritis, that is, inflammation of bones and joints, causes painful and restricted joint motion and places unbalanced stresses on muscles, tendons, and joint cartilage. Osteoarthritis of the shoulder, hip, or knee may make it very difficult to perform activities of daily living. Left unattended, osteoarthritis may certainly require surgery sooner or later. However, for most people there is a much better long-term solution. Regular exercise begun early in life is highly effective in preventing osteoarthritis from developing in the first place.3 If a person is older, regular exercise is also highly effective in providing protection from an osteoarthritic process that may have already begun. With regular exercise, joints and other biomechanical structures are trained to go through their entire available range of motion. Joints are lubricated and muscles are stressed effectively. The resulting activity improves biomechanical function and diminishes the likelihood of developing osteoarthritis. Not only do we gain an improved ability to "take care of business", that is, to perform our activities of daily living, we also gain long-term health and well-being.

1Reed D, et al: Does load influence shoulder muscle recruitment patterns during scapular plane abduction? J Sci Med Sport 2015 Nov 5. pii: S1440-2440(15)00207-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jsams.2015.10.007. [Epub ahead of print]


2Sampath KK, et al: The effects of manual therapy or exercise therapy or both in people with hip osteoarthritis: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Clin Rehabil  2015 Dec 22. pii: 0269215515622670. [Epub ahead of print]


3Kim D, et al: Effect of an exercise program for posture correction on musculoskeletal pain. J Phys Ther Sci 27(6):1791-1794, 2015