WARNING

You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience.

Close [x]

Energy Zappers 

1. Dehydration
Your extreme fatigue might be coming from hidden sources. Nixing these spirit-depleting factors from your life will automatically help reboot your verve.
It turns out that even moderate dehydration (which results in the loss of 3 percent of your body weight) can make you feel mentally sluggish and mess with your concentration. The next time you're feeling foggy or lightheaded, don't just assume you're in serious need of some food. Try downing a glass or two of water.

2. Cell Phones
Checking your cell before bed amps up brain activity, making it harder to doze off. Plus, any electronic gadget's artificial blue light can suppress the sleep hormone melatonin. A 2011 poll by the National Sleep Foundation found that 20 percent of people ages 19 to 29 are awakened by a call, text, or e-mail at least a few nights a week. Power it down well before bedtime.

3. Medication
Many drugs have veiled energy-sapping side effects. Chief among them are some classes of antidepressants and certain beta-blockers used to prevent migraines or treat high blood pressure. If you start a new med and feel more lethargic than usual, see doctor Bert for an alternative. (If there isn't one, take your dose right before bed.)

 4. Overtraining
While working out zaps the stress hormone cortisol, prolonged sweat sessions--like, for example, regularly running for more than 30 minutes at a steady rate--can actually rev cortisol production. Interval training (bursts of intense activity) combined with strength training (free-weight and body-weight moves) helps keep cortisol in check.

5. Low Iron
The mineral shuttles oxygen around your body and removes waste from your cells. If you're not getting around 18 milligrams a day, your body struggles to function properly and you can feel worn out; low iron levels in your diet can cause iron deficiency anemia. If you feel sluggish, call our office and ask for a simple blood test to see if you should be taking a supplement. 

For more information please call our office at 786-360-6355 

Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced

chiropractic exercise

Regular Chiropractic Care and a Successful Exercise Program

Exercisers at all levels of proficiency require a firm foundation upon which to build their ongoing physical prowess and progress. Of course, although exercise is a good in and of itself, the outcome of exercise is a likely greater good, that is, long-term health and wellness. In order to achieve these present and future goals, exercisers must ensure they are solidly supported by a balanced and nutritious diet, sufficient rest, and regular chiropractic care.

For example, one of the primary challenges in maintaining an ongoing vigorous exercise program is the need to exert maximum effort and yet avoid injury. We want to make gains over time, gradually and steadily. But biomechanical limitations such as spinal misalignments may interfere with our progress by causing pain and even muscles strains and ligament sprains. These soft tissue injuries may be very problematic, causing setbacks of weeks and even months. By correcting spinal misalignments and helping prevent injuries before they happen, regular chiropractic care helps you and your family achieve your long-term exercise goals.

We are all of us beginners in some aspects of life and quite advanced in others. With respect to useful knowledge in a specific subject area or meaningful practical expertise as related to a specific skill or competency, most of us could accurately assess our particular level of ability. But when exercise is the skill or subject under consideration, many of us are at a loss to evaluate precisely where we are or how we should be classified.1

For example, yoga classes might be offered at beginner, intermediate, and advanced levels. If you're a basic beginner with no prior yoga experience, you would easily know that you should sign up for the beginner class. If you've participated in yoga consistently for five years and have recently missed two months owing to personal circumstances, you would likely take a few beginner classes to get back in shape, and then could readily rejoin an intermediate or advanced class, depending on your prior level. But if you've taken yoga for several years on an in intermittent basis and have been away from class for quite a while, it may be difficult to know how to restart your yoga practice.

A similar difficulty is present for experienced exercisers who have not done any type of exercise for some time, regardless of whether the specific exercise involves, for example, running, walking, biking, or strength training. One primary problem in returning to exercise after an absence is we want to be sure the time and resources we invest in exercise will yield an appropriate benefit. We are aware of how much weight we used to lift or how fast we used to run or walk and we may imagine that, if we do less than that or exert less effort, we won't get the results we're looking for.

But doing too much too soon will likely result in injury. Aside from the pain incurred by muscle and ligament strains and sprains, an injury will typically set back one's exercise activities by weeks or even months. It's important to recall that engaging in exercise is a lifestyle choice and represents a long-term commitment and course of action. Coming back slowly and steadily after taking time off from exercise will help ensure your return is safe and accomplished successfully. The best approach to exercise when beginning something new or after an absence is always to start at a beginner's level. If you're experienced, you can move up quickly, but beginning at the beginning will always lead to greater rewards.2,3

1Warburton DE, Bredin SS: Reflections on Physical Activity and Health: What Should We Recommend? Can J Cardiol 2016 Feb 26. pii: S0828-282X(16)00064-7. doi: 10.1016/j.cjca.2016.01.024. [Epub ahead of print]


2Kofotolis N, et al: Effects of Pilates and trunk strengthening exercises on health-related quality of life in women with chronic low back pain. J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil 2016 Feb 16. [Epub ahead of print]


3Ciolac EG, Rodrigues-da-Silva JM: Resistance Training as a Tool for Preventing and Treating Musculoskeletal Disorders. Sports Med 2016 Feb 25. [Epub ahead of print]