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Energy Zappers 

1. Dehydration
Your extreme fatigue might be coming from hidden sources. Nixing these spirit-depleting factors from your life will automatically help reboot your verve.
It turns out that even moderate dehydration (which results in the loss of 3 percent of your body weight) can make you feel mentally sluggish and mess with your concentration. The next time you're feeling foggy or lightheaded, don't just assume you're in serious need of some food. Try downing a glass or two of water.

2. Cell Phones
Checking your cell before bed amps up brain activity, making it harder to doze off. Plus, any electronic gadget's artificial blue light can suppress the sleep hormone melatonin. A 2011 poll by the National Sleep Foundation found that 20 percent of people ages 19 to 29 are awakened by a call, text, or e-mail at least a few nights a week. Power it down well before bedtime.

3. Medication
Many drugs have veiled energy-sapping side effects. Chief among them are some classes of antidepressants and certain beta-blockers used to prevent migraines or treat high blood pressure. If you start a new med and feel more lethargic than usual, see doctor Bert for an alternative. (If there isn't one, take your dose right before bed.)

 4. Overtraining
While working out zaps the stress hormone cortisol, prolonged sweat sessions--like, for example, regularly running for more than 30 minutes at a steady rate--can actually rev cortisol production. Interval training (bursts of intense activity) combined with strength training (free-weight and body-weight moves) helps keep cortisol in check.

5. Low Iron
The mineral shuttles oxygen around your body and removes waste from your cells. If you're not getting around 18 milligrams a day, your body struggles to function properly and you can feel worn out; low iron levels in your diet can cause iron deficiency anemia. If you feel sluggish, call our office and ask for a simple blood test to see if you should be taking a supplement. 

For more information please call our office at 786-360-6355 

Neck Pain: Chiropractic Can Help

Who hasn't had neck pain at one time or another? What's more, many of us have experienced on-going neck troubles at some point during our lives. Looking at human anatomy, it's no wonder pain strikes us so often in this vulnerable area. While the neck structure gives us an amazing range of movement with which to see our environment, it also leaves us prone to injury of the muscles, ligaments, tendons and joints. But by making regular visits to the chiropractor, paying attention to posture and doing regular stretching and strengthening exercises, our necks can be pain-free.

Frequent chiropractic adjustments help prevent neck pain from occurring in the first place, but some everyday activities such as poor posture during watching TV, using a computer, reading a book or talking on the phone can easily trigger neck pain. Here are a few tips for avoiding neck pain throughout your day:

  • Pay attention to your posture. Check with your chiropractor for guidelines to help improve your everyday posture.
  • Do not read hunched over a desk or table. Prop reading material at eye level.
  • If you spend long periods on the phone at work or home, consider using a headset rather than cradling the phone between your head and shoulder.
  • Don't crane your neck to see a poorly placed computer monitor. Place the monitor at eye level, square to your shoulders if possible.
  • Ask your chiropractor to show you neck exercises to strengthen weak areas or relax tight muscles.

Neck pain that won't go away or keeps coming back can signal a more serious underlying problem such as a subluxation or degeneration in the joints (such as what occurs with arthritis). If you experience neck pain that doesn't abate within 24 hours, seek the advice of your chiropractor for diagnosis and treatment.