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Energy Zappers 

1. Dehydration
Your extreme fatigue might be coming from hidden sources. Nixing these spirit-depleting factors from your life will automatically help reboot your verve.
It turns out that even moderate dehydration (which results in the loss of 3 percent of your body weight) can make you feel mentally sluggish and mess with your concentration. The next time you're feeling foggy or lightheaded, don't just assume you're in serious need of some food. Try downing a glass or two of water.

2. Cell Phones
Checking your cell before bed amps up brain activity, making it harder to doze off. Plus, any electronic gadget's artificial blue light can suppress the sleep hormone melatonin. A 2011 poll by the National Sleep Foundation found that 20 percent of people ages 19 to 29 are awakened by a call, text, or e-mail at least a few nights a week. Power it down well before bedtime.

3. Medication
Many drugs have veiled energy-sapping side effects. Chief among them are some classes of antidepressants and certain beta-blockers used to prevent migraines or treat high blood pressure. If you start a new med and feel more lethargic than usual, see doctor Bert for an alternative. (If there isn't one, take your dose right before bed.)

 4. Overtraining
While working out zaps the stress hormone cortisol, prolonged sweat sessions--like, for example, regularly running for more than 30 minutes at a steady rate--can actually rev cortisol production. Interval training (bursts of intense activity) combined with strength training (free-weight and body-weight moves) helps keep cortisol in check.

5. Low Iron
The mineral shuttles oxygen around your body and removes waste from your cells. If you're not getting around 18 milligrams a day, your body struggles to function properly and you can feel worn out; low iron levels in your diet can cause iron deficiency anemia. If you feel sluggish, call our office and ask for a simple blood test to see if you should be taking a supplement. 

For more information please call our office at 786-360-6355 

Poetry in Motion

graceful chiropractic flexible

Flexibility, Ease of Motion, and Regular Chiropractic Care

In our day-to-day routine, most of us take flexibility and ease of motion for granted. All the biomechanical processes that result in fluidity of movement take place below the surface, so to speak, and we are not conscious of these physiological actions. We become aware of such mechanisms when they go awry and we experience abnormal or even painful mobility during regular activities.

Regular chiropractic care helps restore our ability to seamlessly perform our activities of daily living by detecting and correcting sources of biomechanical disturbance, most of which are located in the spine. As a result, regular chiropractic care helps to reduce pain and assists us in regaining optimal mobility. In this way, regular chiropractic care helps restore our natural mechanical ability to move through our environment with ease and grace and helps us obtain greater levels of health and well-being.

Many "Seinfeld" fans may fondly remember "The Chaperone," the episode in which the characters Elaine Benes and Mr. Justin Pitt meet for the first time. Elaine is interviewing at Doubleday, a publishing house in New York City. Her conversation with the managing editor turns to Jackie O and the ineffable quality of grace. Elaine says, "You know, grace is a tough one. I like to think I have a little grace." Mrs. Landis, the editor, dismisses Elaine's notion out-of-hand, emphatically stating, "You can't have a little grace. You either have grace or you don't." In the next scene, Mr. Pitt, formerly a great friend of Jackie O, tells Elaine, "You don't want too much grace or you won't be able to stand."

Grace is a quality we instinctively recognize in many ballet dancers, medal-winning gymnasts, and professional athletes. The best of these top-level performers not only possess split-second, real-time response mechanisms to almost instantaneously changing physical circumstances, but also have the ability to make it look easy. That remarkable ability is known to us as grace.

Real people, in addition to certain television characters, require a sufficient quantity of grace. We could say that grace enables us to move fluidly, with ease and economy of motion, through three-dimensional space. Very few people can be all-star athletes, a member of the New York City Ballet, or win an award in a high school- or college-level competitive sport, but almost everyone, by applying the principle of grace, can gain flexibility, improve exercise efficiency, and reduce unnecessary effort as we go about our daily business.

Grace is not at all about looking good. In Major League Baseball, when a shortstop dives to his left to snare a hard-hit grounder, spins 360 degrees, and rifles a throw to first base, or in the WNBA, when a guard slashes to the hoop and causally flips in a reverse layup, none of this effort is directed toward good appearances for photographers or television cameras. All their efforts are being put toward solving an immediate problem and their actions are naturally graceful as a result.

When we, too, focus on the task at hand and purposefully execute a perfect (for us) bench press, a 2-mile run, or a 30-minute session in the pool, we are training our muscles, ligaments, and joints (our musculoskeletal system) to perform at optimum capacity.1,2 As we do this work, our bodies naturally develop greater flexibility and fluidity. Our bodies become more effective at performing physical tasks and the many valuable long-term results include grace. Grace is the outward manifestation of our improved physicality, and as such, is a useful indicator of our improved health and well-being.3


 

Sources

    1. Nakamura PM, et al: Effect on physical fitness of a 10-year physical activity intervention in primary health care settings.         J Phys Act Health 12(1): 102-108, 2015

    2. Chu CH, et al: Exercise and fitness modulate cognitive function in older adults. Psychol Aging 30(4):842-848, 2015

    3. Chung PK, et al: A canonical correlation analysis on the relationship between functional fitness and health-related                 quality of life in older adults. Arch Gerontol Geriatr 68:44-48, 2016