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Energy Zappers 

1. Dehydration
Your extreme fatigue might be coming from hidden sources. Nixing these spirit-depleting factors from your life will automatically help reboot your verve.
It turns out that even moderate dehydration (which results in the loss of 3 percent of your body weight) can make you feel mentally sluggish and mess with your concentration. The next time you're feeling foggy or lightheaded, don't just assume you're in serious need of some food. Try downing a glass or two of water.

2. Cell Phones
Checking your cell before bed amps up brain activity, making it harder to doze off. Plus, any electronic gadget's artificial blue light can suppress the sleep hormone melatonin. A 2011 poll by the National Sleep Foundation found that 20 percent of people ages 19 to 29 are awakened by a call, text, or e-mail at least a few nights a week. Power it down well before bedtime.

3. Medication
Many drugs have veiled energy-sapping side effects. Chief among them are some classes of antidepressants and certain beta-blockers used to prevent migraines or treat high blood pressure. If you start a new med and feel more lethargic than usual, see doctor Bert for an alternative. (If there isn't one, take your dose right before bed.)

 4. Overtraining
While working out zaps the stress hormone cortisol, prolonged sweat sessions--like, for example, regularly running for more than 30 minutes at a steady rate--can actually rev cortisol production. Interval training (bursts of intense activity) combined with strength training (free-weight and body-weight moves) helps keep cortisol in check.

5. Low Iron
The mineral shuttles oxygen around your body and removes waste from your cells. If you're not getting around 18 milligrams a day, your body struggles to function properly and you can feel worn out; low iron levels in your diet can cause iron deficiency anemia. If you feel sluggish, call our office and ask for a simple blood test to see if you should be taking a supplement. 

For more information please call our office at 786-360-6355 

Backpacks and Back Pain

Chiropractic gets two thumbs up!

According to data taken from a nationwide telephone survey of more than 400 randomly selected respondents - all of whom had undergone chiropractic treatment - an overwhelming percentage were either "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with chiropractic care.

53.5 % of those surveyed were "very satisfied" with their care

29.5 % of those surveyed were "satisfied" with their care

Tell your friends and family members about the benefits you've experienced from quality chiropractic care!

Source: Gaumer G. "Factors associated with patient satisfaction with chiropractic care" JMPT 2006;29:455-462.

Backpacks are the tote of choice for most school-aged children with two books per class to lug around. In fact, it is reported that between 92% and 94% of schoolchildren carry backpacks. And it appears these contraptions are evolving somewhat with sturdier-looking designs, heavily padded straps and about a thousand small pockets for pencils, house keys and other knick-knacks. But even though the sturdiest backpacks can withstand the pressure, how are the kids taking it?

On average, children load their backpacks to between 10% and 22% of their own body weight. During a study conducted in 2005, researchers set out to quantify the pressure and pain incurred when backpacks are loaded so heavily. For the study, 10 children wore backpacks loaded to 0%, 10%, 20% or 30% of their body weight for 30 seconds to determine the amount of pressure under the backpack's shoulder straps. While wearing the backpacks, the children were also asked to report whether they felt any pain and, if so, the severity of that pain.

According to the results, pressure beneath the shoulder straps was "significantly increased" when the backpack was loaded at only 10% of the child's body weight - on the low end of the reported average. Increased pressure also was associated with an increase in pain, and interestingly the pressure was always greater on the right shoulder than the left shoulder. Over the long term, the researchers noted that uneven backpack loads could alter the curvature of a child's spine and produce back pain.
The authors of this study compiled their results and offered a few suggestions for parents of school-aged children and their parents:

  1. Backpacks should be positioned high on the back. 
  2. Backpack straps should be worn over both shoulders. 
  3. Weight in the backpacks should be minimized. 
  4. Backpacks should have wide shoulder straps.

It is important to remember that 3 out of every 100 people have some degree of scoliosis - an abnormal curvature of the spine - that begins in childhood and has the potential to worsen over time. Having your child evaluated by a chiropractor is the best way to determine whether he or she has some degree of scoliosis. Chiropractic care can manage any problems related to scoliosis, and a lightened load on their back can have long-term benefits as well!