WARNING

You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience.

Close [x]

Energy Zappers 

1. Dehydration
Your extreme fatigue might be coming from hidden sources. Nixing these spirit-depleting factors from your life will automatically help reboot your verve.
It turns out that even moderate dehydration (which results in the loss of 3 percent of your body weight) can make you feel mentally sluggish and mess with your concentration. The next time you're feeling foggy or lightheaded, don't just assume you're in serious need of some food. Try downing a glass or two of water.

2. Cell Phones
Checking your cell before bed amps up brain activity, making it harder to doze off. Plus, any electronic gadget's artificial blue light can suppress the sleep hormone melatonin. A 2011 poll by the National Sleep Foundation found that 20 percent of people ages 19 to 29 are awakened by a call, text, or e-mail at least a few nights a week. Power it down well before bedtime.

3. Medication
Many drugs have veiled energy-sapping side effects. Chief among them are some classes of antidepressants and certain beta-blockers used to prevent migraines or treat high blood pressure. If you start a new med and feel more lethargic than usual, see doctor Bert for an alternative. (If there isn't one, take your dose right before bed.)

 4. Overtraining
While working out zaps the stress hormone cortisol, prolonged sweat sessions--like, for example, regularly running for more than 30 minutes at a steady rate--can actually rev cortisol production. Interval training (bursts of intense activity) combined with strength training (free-weight and body-weight moves) helps keep cortisol in check.

5. Low Iron
The mineral shuttles oxygen around your body and removes waste from your cells. If you're not getting around 18 milligrams a day, your body struggles to function properly and you can feel worn out; low iron levels in your diet can cause iron deficiency anemia. If you feel sluggish, call our office and ask for a simple blood test to see if you should be taking a supplement. 

For more information please call our office at 786-360-6355 

Detecting Ovarian Cancer

Sinless Decadence

Making good on that resolution you made last month?  You know the one. If so ... give yourself and hand and indulge in a delicious Chocolate Truffle from the kitchen of Eric Lechasseur. With only 86 calories, 5.3 grams of fat and 11 grams of carbs per serving, this little truffle isn't half as sinful as it tastes.

Chocolate Truffles

1 cup soy milk18 oz chocolate chips
2 Tbsp agar flakes
1 tsp cocoa powder + a small bit to 
coat

1. Bring soy milk and agar to a simmer.

2. Add the chocolate chips and cocoa (leaving a bit of  powder for later), mix well until melted, and let cool. Refrigerate for 30 minutes

3. Add pastry pipe to bottom of pastry bag; place chocolate mixture in teh bag and squeeze approximately 30 individual one-ounce sections of chocolate

4. Refrigerate for 20 minutes

5. Once, cool, roll each section into your hands to form a ball

6. Roll chocolate balls in cocoa poweder to coat. Refrigerate again until firm

7. Enjoy!

While women are learning more and more about cervical cancer and its prevention, another "silent killer" remains relatively mysterious among doctors and patients alike. Ovarian cancer is only the seventh most common cancer among women, but it causes more deaths than any other cancer of the female reproductive system. Unfortunately, efficacy of early screening is negligible only because symptoms of the disease are vague and misdiagnosis is common.

What to look for

Most cases of ovarian cancer occur among women over 50 years of age, however the disease can occur in younger women. And risk increases if family members have been diagnosed with the disease.

In a recent study at the University of Washington School of Medicine identified the six symptoms most often and closely associated with ovarian cancer. Researchers compared the clinical histories of women diagnosed with the disease to the histories of "high-risk" women who did not have the disease.

The most common complaints among those women with cancer included the following:

  1. Pelvic pain
  2. Abdominal pain
  3. Increased abdominal size
  4. Abdominal bloating
  5. Difficulty eating
  6. Feeling full quickly

Any one of these symptoms was considered predictive of ovarian cancer risk if it had been present for less than one year, more than 12 days a month. Conceivably, it would be easy to assume these symptoms resultant of premenstrual syndrome or menses itself. Bloating, abdominal bloating and a feeling of fullness are also common symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Awareness is key

The message here is to take these symptoms very seriously, especially those lasting longer than two weeks a month, as they may be more than PMS or digestive discomfort. Address your doctor's questions regarding family history with utmost thoroughness. Awareness - among both patients and doctors - is the first line of defense. And for those suffering from ovarian cancer, regular chiropractic care has been proven time and again to ease pain and improve quality of life during the healing process. A 2001 study published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Manipulative Physiological Therapeutics followed a 54-year-old patient who was able to cease all pain medication following only two chiropractic visits! The focus of chiropractic care is not to directly treat pain, but more specifically, to assist the body in healing itself. Studies show that cancer patients who see their chiropractor experience pain less frequently and to a lesser degree.